Where can CT residents get their “cleanest” electricity?

Posted on Posted in Consumer Advocacy, Customer Service, Fixed Rates, Green/Renewable Energy, Uncategorized

clean green energy

Our friend Barth in Chester asked us some questions about electricity choice in Connecticut. This is one of them:

Where can CT residents get their “cleanest” electricity?

For right now, because Connecticut has limited generation capacity, most of clean renewable energy comes from out of state sources.  If you’re interested in supporting clean energy alternatives, the easiest way to do this is to shop for and sign up for a green, renewable energy plan with an electricity supplier at CTER.

But in the next few years, Connecticut’s clean energy choices will likely increase.

Connecticut’s Clean Electricity Sources

However, in term of capacity, the bulk of renewable power that is produced in Connecticut comes from 13 hydroelectric dams, with capacities running from 1 to 9 megawatts (MW) . According to EIA data from 2010, the state’s primary renewable fuel is landfill gas which generate 739 megawatts followed by hydro which generated 391 megawatts of electricity (total net amount).

There is only one utility scale solar plant in the state, Somers Solar Center, LLC (5 MW) .  Utility-scale wind power has been struggling in the state due to a number of factors, including low velocity wind (wind power class 3) and a 2011 ban on wind farms being constructed in the state which was overturned by the Connecticut supreme court.  Currently, BNE operates two utility-scale wind turbines ( 2.5 megawatt) in Colebrook. A total of 6 are planned.

Over this past year, however, five new clean energy projects state wide are being proposed which include wind, solar, and fuel cell technology.

Connecticut’s renewable portfolio standard sets a goal of obtaining 23% of the state’s electricity from renewable energy resources by 2020.  Connecticut’s renewable portfolio standard sets a goal of obtaining 23% of the state’s electricity from renewable energy resources by 2020. In 2016, only 21.0% came from renewable sources. But, the state’s renewable standard includes CO2 producing sources such as biomass, landfill gas, and waste heat from combined cycle thermal plants (such as natural gas and coal). A complete list of the state’s certified renewable energy facilities is here.

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